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REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 30-35

“CALCIFIC ISLANDS:” A cone-beam computed tomography review of soft-tissue calcifications in head-and-neck region


1 Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Index Institute of Dental Sciences, Indore, MP, India
2 Department of Endodontics and Conservative Dentistry, Index Institute of Dental Sciences, Indore, MP, India
3 Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Index Institute of Dental Sciences, Indore, MP, India
4 Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Government College of Dentistry, Index Institute of Dental Sciences, Indore, MP, India
5 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Index Institute of Dental Sciences, Indore, MP, India

Correspondence Address:
Ajay Parihar
Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Government College of Dentistry, Indore, Madhya Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jomr.jomr_9_20

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Soft-tissue calcification of the head-and-neck region is now commonly seen because of the advent and increased usage of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in dentistry. The purpose of this study is to construe the radiographic characteristics in CBCT of the soft-tissue calcifications in the head-and-neck region. The soft-tissue calcifications of the head-and-neck region may arise from pathological mineralization by deposition of calcium phosphate essentially in an unorganized manner known as “heterotopic calcification.” The three types of heterotopic calcifications are dystrophic calcifications, metastatic calcifications, and idiopathic calcifications (calcinosis). These calcifications can include sialoliths, calcified lymph nodes, carotid artery calcifications, and many more which present themselves with different radiographic presentations. These calcifications can be detected by different two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging techniques, among which CBCT proves to be the best radiographic tool in most of the cases. The anatomic location, number, distribution, pattern, and size of calcifications are important interpretative criteria in radiographic evaluation of soft-tissue calcifications. Soft-tissue calcifications though usually asymptomatic are quite common in the head-and-neck region. An apt radiographic imaging aids in reaching up to the precise diagnosis which may enhance their approach and management by clinicians.


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