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   Table of Contents - Current issue
Coverpage
September-December 2019
Volume 7 | Issue 3
Page Nos. 49-70

Online since Friday, February 14, 2020

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ORIGINAL ARTICLES  

An evaluation of the relation between the maxillary third molars and facial proportions using cephalometric image p. 49
Sanaz Sadry, Ufuk Ok
DOI:10.4103/jomr.jomr_24_19  
Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the position of the third molars and their relationship with pterygomaxillary fissure vertical dimension patterns and on panoramic and cephalometric images. Materials and Methods: In the present retrospective study, the third molar position classifications, third molar positions of patients with cephalometric and panoramic radiographs, and their relationship with vertical skeletal growth and pterygomaxillary fissure were thoroughly investigated in the light of the preoperative clinical and radiologic records from 200 patients with an indication of third molar extraction, who were admitted to İstanbul Aydın University Faculty of Dentistry Oral, Dental and Maxillofacial Radiology Clinic and Department of Orthodontics due to various reasons. Results: The obtained data were evaluated using SPSS (22.0) package program. Regarding the data analysis, Mann–Whitney U-test statistics was used for the analysis of two-variable data. The vertical facial length's relation with the maxillary third molars, which had been examined on cephalometric and panoramic images, was identified as 50.3% for skeletal Class I, 42.1% for skeletal Class II, 7.6% for skeletal Class III, 70.2% for unilateral, and 29.8% for bilateral. The upper impacted wisdom tooth being unilateral or bilateral does not affect the vertical facial length (P = 0.386). The upper wisdom tooth being impacted unilaterally or bilaterally did not exhibit any statistical difference with the parameters of upper-lower and total anterior facial height and posterior facial height. According to the Chi-square analysis, the correlation between gender and pterygomaxillary fissure variable was found to be statistically insignificant (P > 0.05). According to Mann–Whitney U-test results, no variable was found to be statistically significant based on the molar status (P > 0.05). Conclusion: In the light of this study, prior to treatment planning, if the relationship between the third molars and anatomical formations is determined on cephalometric and panoramic radiographs and it is determined whether the impact of upper wisdom teeth remains effective, consider the therapeutic mechanics used in orthodontic treatments and the complications that may arise during surgical operations. It is emphasized that the necessary measures should be considered beforehand in order to prevent these problems.
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Effect of root length over alveolar bone on fracture resistance: Detection by cone-beam computed tomography p. 55
Fumi Mizuhashi, Ichiro Ogura, Yoshihiro Sugawara, Makoto Oohashi, Hirokazu Sekiguchi, Hisato Saegusa
DOI:10.4103/jomr.jomr_25_19  
Background/Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of root length over alveolar bone to the occurrence of root fracture using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods: We reviewed the CBCT images of 176 endodontically treated upper incisors (7 with root fracture and 169 without root fracture) from April 2018 to March 2019. Measurement of the mesial and distal root length over and under the alveolar bone was performed by cross-sectional multiplanar reformation (MPR) image that passing the middle of the distance from the labial side to the palatal side of the tooth, and measurement of the labial and palatal root length over and under the alveolar bone was performed by parasagittal MPR image that passing the middle of the distance from the mesial side to the distal side of the tooth using CBCT. The minimum and average values among the labial, palatal, mesial, and distal root length over and under the alveolar bone were evaluated. The minimum and average values of the root length ratio of over the alveolar bone to under the alveolar bone were also evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed by Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: The minimum and average values of root length over the alveolar bone were statistically significantly different between the tooth with and without root fracture (P < 0.01). The minimum value of the root length ratio of over the alveolar bone to under the alveolar bone was statistically significantly different between the tooth with and without root fracture (P < 0.001). Conclusions: These results suggested that the root length over the alveolar bone was smaller in the tooth with root fracture.
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Tomographic evaluation of the prevalence of the intraosseous branch of the posterior superior alveolar artery p. 60
Eduardo Claudio Lopes de Chaves e Mello Dias, Julia Bellinazzi de Andrade Santos, Khalila Chequer Cotrim, Fabiano Caparo de Brito
DOI:10.4103/jomr.jomr_27_19  
Background: Despite being well documented and relatively safe, sinus lifting procedures can result complications. Aims: This study aimed to evaluate the presence of the intraosseous branch of the posterior superior alveolar artery (ibPSAA) at the surgical access point for maxillary sinus floor elevation procedure. Materials and Methods: A total of 583 tomography slices of 89 patients were analyzed for the presence or absence of this branch. The frequency of the presence of the artery, its diameter, its distance to the maxillary sinus floor, and its distance to the alveolar ridge according to the anatomical region related to the mentioned teeth were also measured. Results: The ibPSAA was visualized using the tomography in 50 patients (56.2%); a total of 583 tomography slices were evaluated and the vessel was identified in 219 slices. The artery had a diameter smaller than 1 mm in 67.9% of the cases and >1 mm in 32.1% of the cases. Conclusion: The present study provides information regarding the anatomy, presence, and most frequent location and size of the ibPSAA and revealed a risk of considerable hemorrhage in 32.1% of the cases, as the ibPSAA had a diameter >1 mm.
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CASE REPORT Top

Role of cone-beam computed tomography for the diagnosis of the labially inverted impaction of maxillary central incisor p. 66
Virender Gombra, Mandeep Kaur
DOI:10.4103/jomr.jomr_19_19  
Impaction of permanent maxillary central incisor is very rare. Inverted impaction of the maxillary central incisor is even more uncommon. Impacted central incisor can cause esthetic concern to the patient or can be associated with the dentigerous cyst. Conventional radiographs including intraoral periapical radiograph, occlusal radiograph, and pantomograph are most commonly advised for the diagnosis and evaluating the location of the impacted tooth. Two-dimensional imaging modality may not exactly locate and evaluate the tooth, root dilacerations, and effect on the surrounding structures. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) will assist in locating the tooth and evaluating the morphology. Inverted impaction of the central incisor has been reported as a rare entity in literature. This article discusses the case report along with the role of CBCT in diagnosis and evaluation of the labially inverted impaction of the central incisor.
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